What Garden Plants Last Year After Year

Different plants have different life spans. Annual plants live only one year. Perennial plants live for many years.

There are two types of perennial plants; woody perennials, which are shrubs and rose bushes, and herbaceous perennials, which make up the bulk of the perennial flower plants.

Annuals

Annuals generally propagate by seed and can be easily grown from seeds. Local garden centers also carry a variety of annual plants that can be easily transplanted into your garden.

Established annuals should be planted in the garden in the spring after all danger of frost is past. You can find out typically when the growing season begins, in your area of the country, from your local garden center or possibly from a farmer’s almanac. Another good source of information for growing seasons in different areas of land would be the farmers association accessed through your local chamber of commerce or library.

Each variety of annual will have different needs for sun exposure and water. Making sure that you give your annuals the proper sun exposure and water will give you longer lasting plants and more colorful blooms in your garden.

Perennials

Many perennials also propagate by seed and are easily grown from seed. However, unlike annuals, some perennials may not bloom the first season and will not reach their full growth for at least two years and often for three to four years. Perennials offer great advantages in the garden for their brilliantly colored blooms and because they do not need to be replanted each year.

Like annuals, perennials also have specific needs for sun exposure, watering and fertilizing.

Bulbs, Rhizomes and Tubers

Bulbs, rhizomes and tubers are part of the root systems of plants like Day Lilies, Iris, Tulips and many other perennial plants. Unlike annuals and perennials that are planted from seed, the bulbs and rhizomes must have at least two months at temperatures below 40 degrees F in order to bloom.

Therefore, these plants should usually be planted in the fall. Perennials may sleep like bears in the woods, throughout the entire winter, but will flourish and blossom come the next Spring.